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Ancient Egypt Gallery

Ta-Bes, Ancient Egyptians Gallery

Leicestershire Ancient Egypt Society       Ancient Egypt Family Trail


Ancient Egypt Gallery
Gallery 5, New Walk Museum & Art Gallery

Leicester has one of the best collections of objects from Ancient Egypt in the East Midlands. Many of our collections were donated by the British School in Rome and the Egypt Exploration Society in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The exhibition at New Walk Museum & Art Gallery looks at what life and death were like for the Ancient Egyptians. The areas explored include food, cosmetics and toiletries, writing, games and building techniques, as well as death, mummification and the afterlife.

Some of the star objects to look out for in the gallery include wooden funerary models of a bakery, brewery and a boat. These objects would have been made to be included with the burial goods in a tomb but they also give us a fascinating insight into what Ancient Egyptian daily life would have looked like.

There are also four mummies on display in the gallery. Their lifestyles and deaths are examined, as is the amazing popularity of mummies as portrayed by the movie industry.

Pa-nesit-tawy

Pa-nesit-tawy and the coffin are currently on display in Taiwan as part of an exhibition called ‘Quest for Immortality’.


Pa-nesit-tawy was found in a tomb near Thebes. He lived around 600 BC. His name is written in hieroglyphics on the top half of his coffin.

X-rays have shown that the mummy found in the coffin was a woman called Ta-ini, who has been returned to her coffin in Liverpool Museum.

The mummy was given to the Prince of Wales when he visited Egypt in 1869. The Prince gave the mummy to the Hon. Oliver Montagu, who gave the mummy to the Huntingdon Literature and Scientific Society. Dr. Garrod of the society presented the mummy to Leicester Museum in 1928.

Pe-iuy

Pe-iuy was found in a tomb in Thebes. He lived around 700-500 BC. The coffin states his name in hieroglyphics and has an image of Thoth, the bird-headed God, leading Pe-iuy to Osiris, god of the dead.

X-rays of the mummy show us that he is male and probably middle-aged when he died. He was in good dental health and had a break in his left upper arm which happened around three weeks before his death.

The mummy and coffin was bought by the Leicester Museum in 1869 for £45.

Bes-en-Mut

Bes-en-Mut was found in a tomb in Akhmim, a town near the Nile, by Professor Maspero. He is the brother of Ta-bes.

He lived around late 800 BC. X-rays of his skeleton show he was a healthy young adult when he died.

On the coffin you can see him following Thoth, a bird-headed God, to Osiris, the god of the dead. Bes-en-Mut’s8217;s shaven head and white robes show he was a priest.

The mummy and coffin was given to the Leicester Museum by Mr and Mrs John Mason Cook. Along with his father, Thomas, John Mason cook founded the famous Thomas Cook & Son travel company.

Ta-Bes

Ta-bes was found in a tomb in Akhmim, a town near the Nile, by Professor Maspero. Bes-en-Mut is her brother.

Ta-bes lived around late 800 BC. Her name is written in hieroglyphics on her coffin.
X-rays show her wisdom teeth have not all grown, making her around twenty years old when she died. Her skeleton shows she suffered from an illness which stopped her growth. This meant she was very short and probably never walked.

The mummy and coffin was given to the Leicester Museum by Mr and Mrs John Mason Cook. Along with his father, Thomas, John Mason Cook founded the famous Thomas Cook & Son travel company.


Leicestershire Ancient Egypt Society


Leicestershire Ancient Egypt Society regularly meet at New Walk Museum & Art Gallery. The lecture programme with leading guest experts in the field, provide an opportunity to hear about the art, architecture, religious beliefs, the intrigues of the Pharaohs and the lives of the ordinary people.

The guest lecturers are usually professional Egyptologists with a national or international reputation. Their talks are tailored for the non-expert audience, so audience members can engage with the lecture, whether they are new to the subject matter, or eager to deepen their knowledge further.

The illustrated talks are supplemented by audience questions after the lecture often leading to stimulating debate! The meetings are informal and usually end with refreshments when members of the audience may have the opportunity of chatting with the guest speaker.

Find out more on the Egyptology societies and groups in Leicestershire and all over the UK.


Ancient Egypt Family Trail


Discover interesting objects, find fascinating facts and make comparisons to modern day life.

The Ancient Egyptians Family Trail is available at New Walk Museum & Art Gallery reception or you can download, and print out, the trail below: