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Humberstone Park

Wooden sculptures in the Sunken Garden

 

This 20 acre park with its attractive gardens, popular children’s play area and sunken garden is located on Uppingham Road, approximately three miles to the east of the city centre.

 

  • History

  • Special Features

  • Bushby Brook

  • Sunken Garden

  • The Rally Bank

  • Park Users

  • Parks Sporting Facilities

  • Refreshments

  • Parking and Access Information

  • How To Get There

 

History

Humberstone Park was opened in 1925 and was one of six multi-purpose parks created in Leicester at that time.  In the 1920’s Leicester’s built up areas increased rapidly and the City Council embarked on a programme to ensure there was a major park within easy reach of each emerging suburban district. Other parks created at this time were Braunstone, Knighton, Evington, Rushey Fields and Aylestone.

The cottage on the park was erected by Thomas Tertius Pageat, a local banker who became a leading figure in Lloyds.  The letters TTP are inscribed above the door.  Pageat built several other houses in the Humberstone area and all feature distinctive, ornate chimneys.

Humberstone village, where the park is located, is thought to take its name from the Danish ‘Hubba’s Ton’, which refers to Hubba’s village or settlement of people.  Humberstone may also derive from Humberd – the place of a bard’s worship.

 

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Special Features

Bushby Brook

The Brook, which flows through the park, was at one time damned and used as a boating lake by local people.  Since the 1950’s it has been straightened and the banks are now planted with willow, birch and hazel.

Sunken Garden

A sunken Garden planted with mixed shrubs and herbaceous plants is an attractive feature.  It also contains a group of wooden sculptures as shown above.

 

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The Rally Bank

Between 1883 and 1962 thousands of people used this line to travel to Skegness for their summer holidays.  Now abandoned, the bank is a haven for wild plants and animals.  The adjacent nature reserve was created from a former allotment site and as well as wild plants such as hawthorn and bramble some original allotment species can still be found. 

More information about Humberstone Park Local Nature Reserve

The park is included in the Passport to Parks scheme - can you find the plaque? 

Park Users

The Humberstone Park User Group meets regularly to discuss issues relating to the park. Everyone is welcome.  Contact the park officers on Tel: 0116 273 3992 for more details.

 

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Parks Sporting Facilities

Facilities include:

  • Bowling green
  • 1 Football pitches
  • Changing facilities
  • 4 Hard surface tennis courts
  • Skate Park
  • Play area

 

Read here for more information about Sport On Parks facilities

For further details please contact Sport On Parks 0116 233 3028 

Refreshments

 Refreshments are available at the Humberstone Park Café. 


 

Parking and Access Information

There are two public car parks with spaces for Blue Badge Holders, one accessed from Uppingham Road and one from Saltersford Road.

The park has tarmac paths throughout and most entrances have easy access except Wicklow Drive which has solid bollards across; and the gate at the Ambassador Road entrance which has ‘Kissing Gates’ which could cause difficulty.  

Public toilet facilities are available in the car park at the side of the cafe.

  

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How To Get There

The Park is located 3 miles to the east of the City Centre.  Take the A47 out of the city on Humberstone Road and then Uppingham Road, before the 'V' junction of Scraptoft Lane, the entrance to the Park is on the right.

For more information contact: Parks Services

 

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Winners of the Green Flag Award 2013
Abbey Park, Aylestone Hall Gardens, Belgrave Cemetary, Castle Gardens, Evington Park,
Humberstone Park, Knighton Park, Spinney Hill Park, Watermead Country Park,
Welford Road Cemetery and Western Park.